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Important Events

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Event:

Committee Workshops

Dates:

May 2 & 3, 2014

Place:

ACSS HQ
1108 O St
Sacramento, CA

NOTE: The workshops are only for the PAC and Legislative Committees, the Presidents' Forum, and the ACSS Board of Directors.

Please call ACSS HQ at (800) 624-2137 to arrange your hotel registration.

Contact Us

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Association of
California State Supervisors

1108 O Street, Suite 400
Sacramento, California 95814
(916) 326-4257 • (800) 624-2137

For questions about this site, contact Kevin Glidden at (916) 326-4302 or kglidden@calcsea.org

ACSS News

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For questions about this Web site please email us.

Author: ACSS Communications Created: 11/13/2008 5:13 PM
Keeping members current with the latest news about ACSS and state excluded employees.

Little attention seems to have been paid to a critical element of Gov. Schwarzenegger's budget proposal: state workers' pensions. The governor is seeking to establish a far less lucrative pension plan than state workers enjoy now, including raising the retirement age in some categories and opening health care coverage to competitive bidders. Any changes would apply only to new employees.

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The Supreme Court ruled this month that the entire burden of proving an age-discrimination charge must rest with the plaintiff. In other discrimation claims, and previously in age-discrimination claims, once the plaintiff proves discrimination occurred the employer must prove it had a legitimate reason for the decision. The FindLaw Web site discusses this new law and provides links to the case and related resources.

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Gov. Schwarzenegger this afternoon issued a statement threatening a third furlough day for state workers if the Legislature does not produce a budget solution before July 1. The third day would bring the total wage cut for state employees to about 14 percent. The furlough would begin with the July pay period. In a late-afternoon telephone conference with state agencies, the DPA's Julie Chapman said it was possible that if the budget issues are resolved by Wednesday, the furlough would not take effect. It is not clear whether the July furlough days will be self-directed -- in other words, taken at the employee's discretion -- or scheduled statewide; the state agencies are looking into which would be better, Chapman said. If it is enacted, the furlough day would run through June 30, 2010.

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In what The Sacramento Bee called "another wasted day," Republican senators united today to defeat the Assembly bills that would have freed up some cash to put off the need for IOUs. In meetings during the morning, the governor had told Republican senators he would veto the bills. Every Republican senator except Abel Maldonado voted against the bills; Maldonado withheld his vote either way. State controller John Chiang says if the budget isn't passed, he will begin issuing IOUs next Wednesday. State workers cannot, by law, be paid in IOUs.

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The Assembly passed two bills today -- and is expected to pass a third -- that will free up cash by deferring some state payments to delay the need for IOUs, but the governor vows to veto them. The Senate is expected to pass the bills later today.

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This may be no surprise to state workers, but the California Budget Project has published a report, based on Franchise Tax Board data from 2007, that shows the income gap between the wealthiest 1 percent of Californians and the middle-income taxpayers has widened. The adjusted gross income of the wealthy has nearly doubled since the early 1990s, more than eight times the increase of the middle income earners. No surprise again: Average corporate profits more than doubled during the same period and almost none of it trickled down.

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If a budget is not adopted by June 30, the state will be forced to issue IOUs to pay its bills for such items as  social services, income tax refunds and vendor and private contractor payments. State workers cannot be paid with IOUs. "Next Wednesday, we start a fiscal year with a massively unbalanced spending plan and a cash shortfall not seen since the Great Depression," Chiang says in a press release. Among the most affected by the IOUs -- officially, registered warrants -- are taxpayers, small businesses and local governments. In addition, resorting to IOUs sends a signal that California has exhausted all other options to manage its cash flow, the press release says. For Sacramento Bee story, click here.

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All but three senators, out of 40, have voluntarily cut their pay at least 5 percent, Sacramento Bee Alert reports. Three, Maldonado, Eng and Lowenthal, have take 18 percent pay cuts. The Assembly total wasn't available, but two weeks ago we reported in this blog that 20 percent of the Legislature had voluntarily reduced their pay. Two senators have gone even further. Sens. Wiggins of Santa Rosa and Denham of Merced gave up their state cars. Wiggins bought her Honda hybrid back.

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One state worker, in the face of pay cuts and insults, wryly defends the general public's misimpression of state service in a Sacramento Bee opinion piece.

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In an opinion piece published Monday in The Sacramento Bee, the California Budget Project's Jean Ross urges legislators to start closing the budget gap by repealing recent tax cuts quietly given to some of the big and powerful corporations. Giving corporate tax breaks while closing parks and severely cutting education represents "misguided priorities," Ross writes. The CBC posted a short response on its Web site.

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The California Budget Project has published a side-by-side comparison of the governor's and Legislature's budget conference committee's budget proposals. A Sacramento Bee story discusses the two proposals and and a budget Q&A explains, as much as possible, how we got into this fix.

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A Sacramento Bee editorial is calling for a freeze not only on pay raises for state workers but also on the step increases.

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Democratic leaders are promising a "share the pain" budget plan next week that will "close the state's deficit without completely shredding California's social service safety net," The Sacramento Bee reports. The budget conference committee has adopted a plan that balances the budget with some new taxes; Gov. Schwarzenegger said yesterday he will not sign a budget that included any tax or fee increases. Read the full plan here.

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Members of ACSS Chapter 512 joined other constituents of Sen. Abel Maldonado (at left in photo, with ACSS labor rep Tom Considine) for a June 12 luncheon that began at Hearst Castle and included seal watching in Cambria and a tour of the Piedras Blancas lighthouse. Maldonado, a Republican, broke with his party to cast the deciding vote for the 2009-2011 budget. “It was the hardest vote in my life,” he said. “At the last minute, I said to myself, ‘California first, Abel Maldonado second,’ and I think other people should have done the same.”  There will be cuts to come, he said, but he also predicts tax increases on such items as cigarettes and alcohol. He has a 17-inch stack of mail decrying the closing of parks -- which hold a "special place" for him -- and has met with disabled people who will suffer from the proposed cuts. “The state needs to move forward in a way that makes us solvent,” Maldonado said. “We can get some good reforms in the next couple of weeks and get this state on our way.”

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Two of California's top pollsters say the May 19 special election was not a referendum against more taxes, as has been interpreted, but an order to fix the budget mess, according to a Sacramento Bee article. California voters strongly favor raising taxes on pornography, cigarettes, alcohol and people who make more than $1 million a year, the pollsters say. The real message: The governor and the Legislature need to avoid delays and pass the budget.

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